J. William Lloyd

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Resources Relating to

J. William Lloyd

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Alphabetical Bibliography
Chronological Bibliography

Books

  • J. William Lloyd, Wind-Harp Songs (Buffalo, New York: The Peter Paul Book Company, 1895).
  • The Red Heart in a White World: A Suggestive Manual of Free Society, 1897.
  • The Red Heart in a White World: A Suggestive Manual of Free Society, 1898.
  • J. William Lloyd, Songs of the Unblind Cupid (Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts: Calamus House, 1899). (poems)
  • Dawn: a volume of pantheistic impressions and glimpses of larger Religion, 1900.
  • J. William Lloyd, The Natural Man, a Romance of the Golden Age (Newark, New Jersey: Benedikt Prieth, 1902).
  • J. William Lloyd, The Dwellers in Vale Sunrise (Westwood, Massachusetts: Ariel Press, 1904).
  • Dawn Thought on the Reconciliation, 1904.
  • Publications relating to Vale Sunrise, 1904.
  • J. William Lloyd, Life’s Beautiful Battle: or, The Human Soul before Pain (Westfield, New Jersey: The Lloyd Group, 1910).
  • November morning, 1910
  • J. William Lloyd, Aw-aw-tam Indian Nights: Being the Myths and Legends of the Pimas of Arizona (Westfield, New Jersey: The Lloyd Group, 1911).
  • Iris-heart: some strange songs about what no man may say, a guesswork for artists in love, 1917.
  • The Book of the Beahrees: The Manifesto of the Religion of Beauty, 1923.
  • Eneres: or, The Questions of Reksa, 1930.
  • The Karezza Method or Magnetation: The Art of Connubial Love. Privately printed for the author, 1931. text online
  • Songs of the Desert, 1932.
  • California vespers: poems of day-endings, night-time and moonlight, 1938
  • From hill-terrace outlooking: poems of perception, intuition and ..., 1939.
  • Fantasies of the strange, 1940.
  • Maxims and Meditations: Volume First, 1940
  • J. William Lloyd, The Scripture of the Serene Life (Santa Barbara, California: Red Rose Press, n.d.). [late '20s or early '30s]
  • Songs overseas: pictures and memories in verse of a vacation, ??.

Articles

Poems

  • "After the Ice-Storm" The New Review 1 (April 12, 1913) 474.
  • "To Francisco Ferrer"
  • "My Arizona Bedroom" Robinson, Will H. 1867-1938. Yarns of the Southwest Phoenix, Ariz., The Berryhill company [c1921] 85-86.
  • "The Hospital at Night" in The doctor's window; poems by the doctor, for the doctor, and about the doctor; ed. by Ina Russelle Warren, Buffalo, New York : C. W. Moulton, 1898. p. 249.

Reviews by Lloyd

Notes

Lloyd, John William

74p. 1, 85 p. 4, 87 p. 1, 89 p. 8, 90 p. 1, 91 p. 1, 91 p. 5, 93 p. 7, 94 p. 4, 94 p. 5, 96 p. 1, 112 p. 8, 117 p. 1, 118 p. 1, 120 p. 5, 121 p. 1, 121 p. 4, 121 p. 7, 124 p. 5, 124 p. 6, 125 p. 4, 133 p. 7, 137 p. 1, 141 p. 5, 143 p. 4, 145 p. 5, 145 p. 7, 149 p. 1, 152 p. 4, 156 p. 1, 159 p. 1, 160 p. 2, 168 p. 6, 171 p. 7, 178 p. 3, 180 p. 2, 182 p. 6, 183 p. 3, 187 p. 5, 199 p. 3, 208 p. 3, 216 p. 1, 220 p. 1, 224 p. 3, 238 p. 1, 242 p. 2, 270 p. 1, 273 p. 1, 295 p. 9, 298 p. 2, 302 p. 1, 323 p. 3, 324 p. 1, 325 p. 5, 326 p. 1, 329 p. 6, 334 p. 4, 336 p. 1, 337 p. 1, 338 p. 4, 350 p. 7, 362 p. 4, 371 p. 1, 389 p. 7; on anarchy, 63 p. 5, 66 p. 7, 70 p. 7, 83 p. 4-5, 133 p. 4-5, 266 p. 2, 292 p. 9, 323 p. 7-8, 329 p. 7-8; on art, 102 p. 5; on children, 129 p. 4-5, 322 p. 6, 325 p. 7; on colonization, 259 p. 2-3; on communism, 141 p. 1; on copyright, 177 p. 6-7, 186 p. 5; on Credit Foncier, 101 p. 7; on Dahl, 338 p. 4; on duty, 270 p. 1; on egoism, 107 p. 5, 119 p. 7; on M. Emerson, 134 p. 5; on evolution, 170 p. 6, 172 p. 6; on Fair Play, 152 p. 1; on force, 116 p. 4-5, 120 p. 5, 161 p. 7; on game laws, 301 p. 4; on Haymarket, 110 p. 1; on humanity, 77 p. 1; on Indians, 152 p. 5-6; on invasion, 135 p. 7; on labor, 97 p. 1; on law, 75 p. 7, 216 p. 3-4; on liberty, 127 p. 4-5; on Liberty, 88 p. 7; on M. Louise, 143 p. 5-8; on love, 137 p. 7, 139 p. 4-5, 168 p. 5-6, 196 p. 3-4; on Mackay, 232 p. 3-4; on marriage, 190 p. 3-4; on Mazzini, 262 p. 3; on money, 151 p. 6; on morality, 95 p. 7, 273 p. 2; poems, 66 p. 1, 68 p. 1, 72 p. 1, 84 p. 1, 92 p. 1, 95 p. 1, 112 p. 7, 125 p. 7, 128 p. 7, 132 p. 5, 135 p. 1, 144 p. 1, 158 p. 1, 228 p. 1, 243 p. 4, 279 p. 4, 307 p. 6-7, 337 p. 6, 388 p. 1; on G. Replogle, 386 p. 5; on rights, 72 p. 7, 332 p. 6-7; on J.B. Robinson, 195 p. 4; on sex, 123 p. 6; on sports, 306 p. 6; on the state, 86 p. 5; on state benefits, 125 p. 4-5; on strategy, 153 p. 4-5; on tolerance, 157 p. 2-3; on Tucker, 99 p. 5, 155 p. 5; on Walker, 91 p. 8; on Whitman, 220 p. 3-4; on X, 82 p. 1; on Yarros, 91 p. 7, 99 p. 5, 151 p. 5; Andrews on, 74 p. 1; L. Holmes on, 293 p. 8; on Leonard, 303 p. 5, 310 p. 7; on G. Macdonald, 330 p. 7; S.R. on, 367 p. 3-4; Tucker on, 86 p. 5, 88 p. 1, 91 p. 8, 95 p. 1, 99 p. 5, 102 p. 5, 126 p. 1, 137 p. 1, 141 p. 1, 151 p. 4, 151 p. 5, 153 p. 5-6, 154 p. 1, 155 p. 6, 157 p. 6-7, 157 p. 8, 168 p. 1, 177 p. 6, 261 p. 2, 262 p. 2, 266 p. 2, 273 p. 2-3, 301 p. 1, 306 p. 1, 322 p. 4-5, 323 p. 4-5, 327 p. 3-4, 328 p. 4-5, 329 p. 4-5, 332 p. 1, 350 p. 1, 352 p. 5, 362 p. 5, 370 p. 5, 396 p. 26; E.C. Walker on, 297 p. 8; X.Y.Z. on, 332 p. 7-8; Yarros on, 87 p. 7-8, 95 p. 5, 170 p. 6, 172 p. 6; Zelm on, 132 p. 7. See also The Anarchists' March, The Dwellers in Vale Sunrise and The Red Heart in a White World.

Biographical Accounts

  • "J. William Lloyd, Philosopher of the Paradox" The International November, 1911
  • J. WILLIAM LLOYD.

J WILLIAM LLOYD was born at Westfield, New Jersey, in 1857, of Welsh-English parents. The Lloyds, one of the most ancient of the noble families of Wales, have from remotest times counted among their kin famous Cymric bards, both musicians and poets. None who are familiar with the songs of the American representative of his race will deny that he worthily sustains the fame of its genius. Having, at the age of nineteen, sufficiently profited by the excellent educational advantages afforded by New England schools, he chose for his life work the profession of medicine, and entered upon a course of preparatory study. Fortunately for literature this plan was not destined to be successful, the sudden death of his preceptor, Dr. Troll, so much interfering with his arrangements that he decided to remove to Kansas and devote himself to making a home in the then "New West." This endeavor meeting at first with flattering success, Mr. Lloyd soon after married Miss Marie Elizabeth Emerson, a young lady of unusual beaqty of person and character, who had been his fellow-student under Dr. Troll. Prospects were bright for the young poet and his lovely wife, but the deceptive and capricious Kansas climate brought disaster to them as to hundreds of others. Repeated seasons of drought proved too much for the brave young home-makers, and they removed to Iowa as a temporary location. In 1883 an hygienic college was incorporated near Mount Eagle, Tennessee, and Mr. Lloyd became one of its managers. The institution did not prosper, for though well equipped, and with competent faculty, it was not on a sound financial basis. It therefore seemed expedient that Mr. Lloyd should secure more remunerative occupation. With this in view he removed to Florida. The change proved an unfortunate one. Palatko was the point chosen for permanent location. The season was a sickly one, and Mrs. Lloyd succumbed to the influence of the deadly malaria of the country. The beautiful, patient, loving wife, after a few days' illness, died. The heart-broken husband and father, left with his two motherless children in a strange land, thought longingly of his boyhood's home. He returned with his children to Westfield, where, in its familiar scenes and among appreciative friends, he finds rest and leisure for his literary work. Mr. Lloyd is distinctively an American poet. His verse reflects the sky and atmosphere of his country, and catches the keynote of its winds, waves and forests. It has in an eminent degree the subtle, elusive, yet distinct quality of national character which marks the true folk-song of old countries. M. H. A.

Source: The Magazine of poetry and literary review, Volume 3, p. 463.